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Dealing with Stress

Stress can be debilitating and now, more than ever, people are suffering from this invisible evil. Whether you have been battling stress and anxiety all your life, or recent events (see: global pandemic) have begun to take their toll, it’s never too late to learn strategies for coping with stress. Since April is National Stress Awareness month, we thought we would share some tips and tricks for dealing with stress (whether its Covid-19 related or not).

The good news is, everyone experiences stress at some point in their lives and some stress can even be beneficial. Too much stress, however, can wear you down and make you sick-both mentally and physically. Now, Covid-19 has been added to people’s normal stressors, making what once might have been manageable, completely overwhelming.

According to WebMD, the first step to controlling stress is to know the symptoms of stress. However, most of us are so used to being stressed, we often don’t realize it until it’s too late, so identifying symptoms can be harder than you think. Here is a list of stress symptoms that you might experience:

Recognizing that you are stressed out is just the first step. There are also several things you can do to help cope with your stress. Here are some tips for coping with stress from the CDC.

While it is impossible to prevent yourself from experiencing stress, it is possible to prepare for it. Knowing your stress symptoms can help you recognize when you are becoming overwhelmed, and give you time to use coping mechanisms before it gets too far.

If you, or someone you care about, is feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, it is important to reach out and get help.
D.C.’s Access Helpline can be reached 24/7 to connect you to services provided by the Department of Behavioral Health and its certified behavioral health care providers. Call 1-888-793-4357 for immediate help.
You can also visit the Disaster Distress Helpline, call 1-800-985-5990, or text TalkWithUs to 66746.